Use This News Article Rubric for Grading Middle or High School Students

News Article Rubric for Teachers

Show students how to write a news article. When they forget, remind them how to write an article again with the following well-organized rubric. Students may also find this article helpful in coming up with ideas and perfecting the news-writing style.

“A” Article

  • Components:

    The article contains six components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The article is written with the most important information first.

  • Style:

    The story contains an interesting lead which hooks the reader.

  • Language:

    All sentences are clear, concise, and well written. Many details are included. Many active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article contains short paragraphs that flow together. The last paragraph ends with a quote or catchy phrase.

“B” Article

  • Components:

    The article contains five components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The article is written with the most important information contained within the article.

  • Style:

    The story contains an interesting lead which hooks the reader but dies not capture the true meaning of the article.

  • Language:

    Most sentences are clear, concise, and well written. Many details are included. Many active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article mostly contains short paragraphs that flow together. The last paragraph ends with a quote or catchy phrase but does not capture the true meaning of the article.

“C” Article

  • Components:

    The article contains three or four components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The information makes sense but the organization is somewhat confusing.

  • Style:

    The lead does not hook the reader nor does it convey the true meaning of the article.

  • Language:

    Many of the sentences are too long, run-ons, or fragments. Very few details are included. Very few active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article contains paragraphs which are mostly too long and do not lead to the next paragraph. The last paragraph ends with a quote or catchy phrase that does not capture the true meaning of the article.

“D” Article

  • Components:

    The article contains one or two components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The article is written in no logical order.

  • Style:

    There is no lead to the story.

  • Language:

    Most of the sentences are too long, run-ons, or fragments. Very few details are included. Very few active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article contains no paragraphs or paragraphs which are mostly too long and do not lead to the next paragraph. The last paragraph does not end with a quote or catchy phrase that does not capture the true meaning of the article.

This post is part of the series: Rubrics

End arguments, raise standards, and improve instruction with rubrics.
  1. Using Rubrics for Student Notebook Checks
  2. Owning Your Very Own Persuasive Essay Rubric
  3. Making Grading Easier with this General Essay Rubric
  4. News Article Rubric for Middle or High School Students