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Learn Cardinal and Ordinal Numbers in Czech

written by: Elizabeth Stannard Gromisch • edited by: Sarah Malburg • updated: 8/2/2012

Cardinal numbers are used for counting, and ordinal numbers are used for rank. Learn the two types of numbers in Czech, cardinal numbers and ordinal numbers, in this article about the Czech language.

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    One of the 23 official languages of the European Union, Czech is the official language of the Czech Republic and is also used in Slovakia. Numbers, or číslovky, in Czech are divided into two groups just as with other languages: cardinal numbers and ordinal numbers. Cardinal numbers are used for counting, e.g., one, two and three, while ordinal numbers are used for rank, e.g., first, second and third. For help with pronunciation, see this article on Czech phrases.

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    Cardinal Numbers: Základní Číslovky

    Cardinal numbers are used as adjectives in Czech, which means that the number must meet the gender of the noun; the Czech language has three genders: masculine, feminine, and neuter. But do not worry — only the numbers for one and two have different gendered numbers. For example:

    • One (masculine): jeden
    • One (feminine): jedna
    • One (neuter): jedno
    • Two (masculine): dva
    • Two (feminine/neuter): dvě

    For all other cardinal numbers, there is only one number. Let's go over the cardinal numbers for 0 through 10:

    • 0: nula
    • 1: jeden, jedna, jedno
    • 2: dva, dvě
    • 3: tři
    • 4: čtyři
    • 5: pět
    • 6: šest
    • 7: sedm
    • 8: osm
    • 9: devět
    • 10: deset

    When we use a cardinal number in Czech, the number precedes the noun just as in English. For example:

    • three books: tři knihy

    To form the numbers between 11 and 18, we take the singular cardinal number and add náct; the cardinal number for 19 has a slightly different formation. Let's go over them:

    • 11: jedenáct
    • 12: dvanáct
    • 13: třináct
    • 14: čtrnáct
    • 15: patnáct
    • 16: šestnáct
    • 17: sedmnáct
    • 18: osmnáct
    • 19: devatenáct

    Let's go over the numbers 20 to 100:

    • 20: dvacet
    • 30: třicet
    • 40: čtyřicet
    • 50: padesǎt
    • 60: šedesát
    • 70: sedmdesát
    • 80: osmdesát
    • 90: devadesát
    • 100: sto

    To form a number like 21, we take the number for 20 and the number for one. For example: dvacet jeden. The same applies to higher numbers such as those in the hundreds and thousands. Let's go over some of the higher numbers in Czech:

    • 200: dvě stě
    • 300: tři sta
    • 400: čtyři sta
    • 500: pět set
    • 600: šest set
    • 700: sedm set
    • 800: osm set
    • 900: devět set
    • 1,000: tisíc
    • 2,000: dva tisíce
    • 3,000: tři tisíce
    • 4,000: čtyři tisíce
    • 5,000: pět tisíc
    • 6,000: šesit tisíc
    • 7,000: sedm tisíc
    • 8,000: osm tisíc
    • 9,000: devět tisíc
    • 10,000: deset tisíc
    • 100,000: sto tisíc
    • 1,000,000: milión
    • 1,000,000,000: miliarda
    • 1,000,000,000,000: bilión
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    Ordinal Numbers: Řadové Číslovky

    Like ordinal numbers in other languages, Czech ordinal numbers are used to state rank. Let's go over the ordinal numbers from first to 20th:

    • 1st: první
    • 2nd: druhý
    • 3rd: třetí
    • 4th: čtvrtý
    • 5th: pátý
    • 6th: šestý
    • 7th: sedmý
    • 8th: osmý
    • 9th: devátý
    • 10th: desátý
    • 11th: jedenáctý
    • 12th: dvanáctý
    • 13th:třináctý
    • 14th: čtrnáctý
    • 15th: patnáctý
    • 16th: šestnáctý
    • 17th: sedmnáctý
    • 18th: osmnáctý
    • 19th: devatenáctý
    • 20th: dvacátý

    When using ordinal numbers, the number again goes before the noun. For example:

    • the third person: třetí osoba

References