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The Princess and the Golden Shoes: Preschool Folktale Lesson

written by: R. Elizabeth C. Kitchen • edited by: Elizabeth Wistrom • updated: 7/12/2012

This early childhood literature lesson plan will explore folktales. This lesson plan focuses on The Princess and the Golden Shoes.

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    The Princess and the Golden Shoes is a folktale that is very similar to Cinderella. All folktales have an easily understood moral to the story making them perfect for preschoolers. This lesson will have students increase their reading skills, as well as their comprehension, critical thinking, writing, and spelling skills.

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    • Early childhood literature lessons will help children learn different variations to classic and well-known folktales.
    • Children will learn what a folktale is.
    • Children will learn a little about Scotland.
    • Children will learn about The Princess and the Golden Shoes.
    • Children will practice writing, letter writing, and will enhance their writing, spelling, comprehension, art, and critical thinking skills.
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    Materials Needed

    Early Childhood Literature Lesson Plans - Globe boston For this early childhood literature lesson teachers will need the following items:

    • The Princess and the Golden Shoes book
    • A globe or map
    • A dictionary
    • Plain white paper (two sheets per child)
    • One pencil per child
    • Plenty of crayons for each child

    Teachers should also print out a copy of this folktale for all students so that they all have a copy. This can be found online at this site for free.

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    Teachers and students will discuss that the folktale is from Scotland and will briefly discuss a few common facts about the country of Scotland.
    Students should gather around the globe or map and try to find Scotland. Teachers should ask the students if they have been to Scotland, know anyone from Scotland, or have a Scottish background. If so, have those students share a little bit about their experiences.

    Pass a copy of the folktale out to the students and make sure each student has a copy. Then, read the story to the children.

    Choose about eight to ten words from the story, such as “perplexed" and "niche", and ask the children if they know what they mean. Discuss the definitions and help the children use them in a sentence.

    Discuss the story with the children. Ask each child what their favorite part of the folktale was and why.

    Have the children draw their favorite scene in the story using their copy of the folktale as a reference. Have the children write one to two sentences on the back of their drawing describing the scene they choose. Then create a book with all of the children's drawings and make sure to include a copy of the folktale on the first page.

    Define and discuss what a folktale is as a group.

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    Important Points to Discuss as a Class

    • Discuss how cruel the queen was to the princess and ask the children how they felt about this.Early Childhood Literature Lesson Plans - Princess 
    • Discuss how the henwife's daughter was different and what she used her differences for.
    • Ask the children who brought the princess food.
    • Discuss what happened when the queen discovered that the princess was being brought food.
    • Ask the children what the bird told the prince.
    • Ask the children if they liked the story, or disliked the story, and why.
    • Discuss with the children how this folktale differed from Cinderella. For example, less sisters, different characters, a golden shoe instead of a glass slipper, etc.
    • Help the children name all of the characters and discuss each character with the children.
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    Once this lesson plan is complete students will be able to dive into other literature lessons to further expand these skills and their knowledge.