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Preschool Lesson Plan on Money: Pennies, Nickels, and Dimes Oh My!

written by: Tracey Bleakley • edited by: Sarah Malburg • updated: 1/5/2012

Learning about money can be challenging for young students. Teach your preschoolers a poem to help them recognize the different coins and then play a matching game to practice naming coins. Lessons on money like this one have great "value" for your students!

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    Your students will have fun learning the names of the coins with this pre-K lesson about money. Use real coins for the matching game if you can. It will make it easier for your students to learn their coins.

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    Materials

    • Money poem written on large chart paper
    • Large picture of a penny, nickel, dime and quarter
    • One sock with a penny, nickel, dime and quarter inside (for each of student)


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    Money Poem

    Penny, penny, easily spent.

    Copper brown and worth one cent.

    Nickel, nickel, thick and fat.

    You're worth five cents, I know that.

    Dime, dime, little and thin.

    I remember, you're worth ten.

    Quarter, quarter, big and bold.

    You're worth twenty-five I am told.


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    Teach

    Display the money poem that you have written on chart paper. Read it through one time to the class. Then show the students the four large money pictures. Read the poem again a verse at a time and match up the pictures of the coins with the correct verse. Discuss the coins and what they look like and feel like. Tell your students that the dimes and quarters will have rough edges and the nickels and pennies will have smooth ones.

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    Procedure

    After teaching your students the different coins, play a matching game to practice identifying the coins. Pass out a sock with the four coins inside to each student. Have the students dump the coins out onto their desks. Tell them to find the penny. Talk about the penny again and reread the penny verse of the poem and be sure to point out its color, size and smooth edge. Have them look at the front and back. Follow the same procedure for each of the next three coins. Then have the students put the coins back in their socks and call out the name of a coin. Tell them to put their hand in the sock and try to find the coin just by feeling. When they pull out the coins they can check to see if they found the right one and then try again, if they didn't. Continue to play, calling out different coins.

    When the students seem to be able to find the coins. Put them in pairs and let them play a version of this coin matching game. The first student pulls a coin out of his sock and then names it. His partner checks that he correctly identified the coin and tries to pull the same coin out of her sock without looking. Then both students return their coins to the socks and switch roles.

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    Assess

    Observe the students as they play. Are they naming the coins correctly? Can they find the right coin without looking?

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    Extend

    • This game can be put into a math center so that students can continue to play and practice.
    • Read books about money and coins. Some that are appropriate for preschool are All About Money by Erin Robertson and 26 Letters and 99 Cents by Tana Hoban.
    • Give your students handfuls of coins to sort by type.
    • Let your students use money stamps, money stickers or real coins to make patterns. Have them practice reading the patterns to a friend "Penny, penny, nickel, penny,penny, nickel ..."

    Your pre-K students can have lots of fun while learning about money.