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George Washington Preschool Activities

written by: Kendra Dahlstrom • edited by: Elizabeth Wistrom • updated: 9/11/2012

History doesn't have to bore children. Learning about the first president of the United States can be fun with the right lesson plan. This article has several different ideas to plan fun and educational George Washington preschool activities.

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    George Washington provides a good starting point when teaching United States history. Since he was the first president of U.S.A., it makes sense for early educators to begin history lessons with his life. George Washington preschool activities don't have to be boring or dull, in fact, his life was actually quite fascinating. Of course, young children won't remember every U.S. president at first, but as long as they know the current and first president, they're doing well. Here are some fun activities to introduce George Washington to your preschool class, especially around Presidents' Day.

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    Hand Cherry Tree Craft

    The story of George Washington and the cherry tree teaches children that everyone makes mistakes, but telling the truth is more important than lying to stay out of trouble. As the stories goes, young George receives a hatchet as a gift. He loved chopping things down with it and one day chopped his father's favorite Cherry tree. The tree died and his father became very upset. He went around asking everyone if they knew who killed his tree and finally, George says, "I cannot tell a lie, you know I cannot tell a lie." Then he tells his father the truth and his father's anger washes away with pride that the boy told the truth even when he knew he would get in trouble.

    One of the George Washington preschool activities that goes along with this theme is a finger paint cherry tree. Trace each child's forearm and fingers on one hand. The forearm acts as the truck and the fingers act as the branches. Then, give the children red finger paint and have them dip a finger in the paint and dot it all over the tree's branches like little cherries.

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    Cherry Tree Song

    Another activity that goes along with the Cherry tree craft is a song about George Washington cutting down the tree. It is called, "Do You Know Who Chopped the Tree". Sing it to the tune of "Do You Know the Muffin Man".

    1. Do you know who chopped the tree,
    2. Chopped the tree, chopped the tree.
    3. Do you know who chopped the tree,
    4. Daddy asked young George.

    1. Yes I know who chopped the tree,
    2. Chopped the tree, chopped the tree.
    3. Yes I know who chopped the tree,
    4. Honest Georgie Said.

    1. It was I who chopped the tree,
    2. Chopped the tree, chopped the tree.
    3. It was I who chopped the tree,
    4. I cannot tell a lie.

    1. Thank you George for the truth,
    2. For the truth, for the truth.
    3. Thank you George for the truth,
    4. I'm so proud of you.
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    Mount Rushmore Craft

    ladyheart mount at morguefile Another fun George Washington preschool activity involves creating a little Mount Rushmore with everyday coins and modeling clay. All you need is one penny, nickel, dime, and quarter per child. You also need enough modeling clay or play dough for each child to create 4 mini-mountains. Tell the children to mold a little mountain range with four main peaks. They can make four individual mountains right next to each other or a connected mountain range with four peaks. Then, give have them press the quarter, nickel, dime, and penny into the peaks from left to right. This represents the faces of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. Explain that although Theodore Roosevelt is on the real Mount Rushmore, the president on the dime is actually Franklin Roosevelt. Have the

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    Presidents' Day is a great time to talk to preschoolers about George Washington. You could center an entire day or week around George Washington preschool activities. Simply use your imagination and extract the information children would find interesting and present it in an entertaining way.

    Unless otherwise noted, all information and ideas are taken from my previous classroom experience.

    Image Credit:

    Ladyheart at MorgueFile.com