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All Aboard for these Preschool Train Crafts!

written by: Tania Cowling • edited by: Tania Cowling • updated: 1/20/2012

Get onboard with these three preschool train crafts. Your class will have a blast with these imaginative crafts that enhances any train or transportation lesson plan. Read on for some train time fun!

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    You Are on the Right Track!

    “Chugga-Chugga Choo-Choo!” is the sound that will get your preschoolers excited about trains. You can keep that excitement going with these fun preschool train crafts. These crafts will enhance any train or transportation lesson plan. They also could be used along with many preschool books involving trains for hands-on learning. Whatever the reason may be, know that when you use these crafts you will be on the right track for educational fun!

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    Preschool Train Crafts

    Let's Make a Train! 

    Let's Make a Train!

    Materials Needed:

    -construction paper with a simple drawing of a train body minus the parts that will be added by the student, 1 per child

    -pre-cut parts of a train, 1 set per child

    -crayons or markers

    -glue sticks

    This craft is specific to characteristic parts found on a train.Hand out a piece of construction paper to each student.On the paper have a picture of a train body.Then have ready pre-cut parts of a train.Each student will receive a smoke stack, 2 wheels, a track, and a triangular pilot otherwise known as a “cow catcher.”Have the students color the pre-cut parts using crayons or markers.Then offer them a finished model to go by, and ask them to place their parts on the train body they received.Using glue sticks, they will build their first model train.What a great experience you can offer them!

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    Child Hand Train Child Hand Train

    Materials Needed:

    -any color construction paper, 1 piece per child

    -white construction paper, 1 piece per child

    -pre-cut train, 1 per child

    -markers or crayons

    -safety scissors

    -glue sticks

    You could capture a moment in time with these child hand trains. Hand every student one piece of construction paper (any color), one piece of white construction paper, and one pre-cut train engine or locomotive. Draw and cut out your students’ hands using the white construction paper. If your students are able they can help you with this task. Ask the children to color the train, as well as their hands. Once this task is completed have the children place their “train” on the other piece of paper, and glue it down. Then you can add wheels to the “train” as well as a tying line so the hands become pulled train cars. Add their names to the engine as well as a year, and you will have a great memento of their preschool years!

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    Train Tracks Train Tracks

    Materials Needed:

    -Popsicle sticks 3 per child

    -paint or markers

    -glitter (optional)

    -yarn (optional)

    This craft can be used as a supplement to any train activity. You could hang the finished product on a wall or as a keepsake ornament, just by adding yarn! Hand each child 2 uncut Popsicle sticks and one stick pre-cut into 3 pieces. Ask the children to color or paint the sticks. Add glitter for a special touch! Please keep in mind when using glitter that it may pose a risk to a little one's eyes causing irritation if rubbed into it. Use proper hand washing practices after any art or craft project. Once the paint has dried, you can glue the pieces together to form train tracks. This craft activity will add a special touch to any train related book lesson plan you have planned!

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    All Aboard!

    Your whole class will be on board with these preschool train crafts. These crafts can be changed toward your specifications depending on the skill level of the students. They will enhance any preschool train or transportation curriculum. Crafts offer preschoolers a tangible learning experience, plus they can take home the fun!

    Safety Disclaimer

References

  • The information offered in this article is based on the author's personal experience as an early childhood professional.

    All images are from the original author, all rights reserved