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Go Buggy! 3 Bug Crafts for Preschoolers

written by: Bright Hub Education Writer • edited by: Tania Cowling • updated: 11/12/2014

Stop and read this article if you are looking for some buggy fun in your classroom. Whether used as a supplement to an insect lesson plan, or as simple fun for youngsters, these crafts are sure to send your classroom abuzz.

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    Don't Stop Bugging Me!

    Just mention the word bugs and watch the majority of your class squirm in their seats. These preschool bug crafts will allow fun ways to Hunting for Bugs introduce your students to the world of insects and their characteristics. Major characteristics include a body that is segmented into three parts, six legs, one pair of antennae, a pair of eyes (compound) and two pairs of wings. There are some bugs that don't have all of these characteristics, such as flies that only have one pair of wings, so make sure that you make note of this in class.

    Before the students begin, demonstrate how tasks should be completed in a step-by-step manner, which will also give them a model when you are finished to reference throughout their construction time. Due to the differing levels of preschoolers, some crafts may need to be altered according to student's skill level.

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    Shoo-Fly

    Materials Needed:Shoo-Fly 

    Black construction paper, with the outline of the child's shoe on it (each child should have one)

    Pre-cut circles from green construction paper that are 1" in diameter (two for each child)

    Pre-cut wings from white construction paper that are 3x2 inches (two for each child)

    Pre-cut legs from black construction paper that are cut with a bent to represent the segment (six for each child)

    Pre-cut antennae from black construction paper (they are connected, so one for each child)

    Glue sticks (enough for the children to share, or one for each child)

    Safety scissors (enough for the children to share, or one for each child)

    Black Marker or crayon (enough for the children to share, or one for each child)

    Prior to the start of this craft, outline each child's foot onto the sheet of black construction paper. Label them clearly so they are handed out to the correct student. Once they are received, have the children practice their fine motor skills by cutting out the pattern of their shoe. This will become the body of the fly. Have the children mark two lines on their fly body to represent the three segments of the insect. Once this step is completed, have them glue on the wings, eyes, antennae and legs according to your model. Once their "shoo-flies" are completed they will have hands-on learning to some of the special parts of an insect that will also be a memory of their time in preschool.

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    Bug-Eyes

    Materials Needed:Bug-Eyes 

    Pre-cut Bubble Wrap, or hand-drawn circles on white construction paper, 2" in diameter, (two for each child)

    Green construction paper with the outline of a 5x3" oval on it (one for each child)

    Safety scissors (enough for the children to share, or one for each child)

    Glue sticks (enough for the children to share, or one for each child)

    Yarn or ribbon in any color (two 10" pieces for each child)

    Insects have a wonderful characteristic called compound eyes, which are hundreds to thousands of facets working together to create an image. Although the science is beyond that of a preschool curriculum, children will have a blast creating mock bug eyes. They will be able to recognize this unique characteristic of insects when finished with this craft.

    Begin by handing each student the piece of green construction paper with the oval shape drawn on it. Have them cut out the shape of the oval. Once completed, hand out the two circles of either Bubble Wrap or white construction paper with the hand drawn circles. Also hand out the two pieces of yarn or ribbon at this step. Next, the children will glue the ribbon on the smaller edges of the oval and then the Bubble Wrap over the oval and the ribbon, locking it into place. Once the children are finished with this step, the teacher is to cut eye holes in the middle of their mask. Now they have a whole new way to see the world!

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    Their Turn

    Materials Needed:

    Pre-cut bodies of insects from multiple-colored construction paper, but all the same size

    Pre-cut wings from multiple-colored construction paper, but all the same size

    Pre-cut antennae (combined just like the fly craft to differentiate from legs) from multiple-colored construction paper, but all the same size

    Pre-cut legs from multiple-colored construction paper, but all the same size

    Pre-cut eyes from multiple-colored construction paper, but all the same size

    Crayons or markers in all colors

    Glue sticks (enough for the children to share, or one for each child)

    Upon completion of your insect theme you could use this craft as an assessment tool. Quiz students on the characteristics of insects previously taught. Ask the children to create bugs of their own. The colors make it fun, but you will have the opportunity to observe if they understood all the parts to an insect. If they are having difficulty, have a model available for them to reference. The crayons are there for the creation of the segments, but they could also be used to decorate their colorful bugs.

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    Funny Little Creatures Make Fun Memories

    These bug crafts allow preschoolers to enjoy bugs instead of running from them. You will be offering them an interactive introduction into this fascinating world of insects, and allowing for their creativity to have a chance to flourish.

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    Reference

    Insect Characteristics, MySchoolhouse.com

    Compound Eyes, from Park.org, Canadian Museum

    Source: crafts are created from author’s own experience

    Images: provided by author, all rights reserved