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Preschool Language Literacy Activities

written by: Rebecca Mayglothling • edited by: Tania Cowling • updated: 9/11/2012

Discover three different methods of allowing children to experience literacy through language activities. Children will practice reading, writing, listening and speaking through activities done alone or together.

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    Preschool language literacy activities are implemented in four general forms: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Activities may incorporate all or some of these categories. Preschool students should have exposure and opportunity to share with peers, listen to the ideas of others, and practice basic reading and writing skills. Whole class activities as well as individual free play activities can be prepared to help children fully understand language literacy and build a base of knowledge for future literacy lessons.

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    My Own Book

    This project can take a few days or weeks to complete. Allow the children to pick a story line, such as "My Christmas" or "A Trip to My Favorite Destination." Staple a pile of four or five pages together, then tell children to write one to two sentences per page. Allow children to illustrate their short paragraphs. When the books are finished, allow the children to share the books during group time. The books can be shared one or two at a time a day until all children have been able to share. This activity covers the reading, writing, listening and speaking aspects of language literacy.

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    Traceable Partners

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    Gather worksheets designed for literacy concepts. Place the worksheets inside page protectors bought at office supply stores, or place a sheet of contact paper over the front and back of the worksheet. Provide children with dry erase markers and allow children to complete the worksheets during quiet time alone or together with their friends. These worksheets promote reading and writing skills, and the project can be wiped clean with a damp paper towel to create a fresh worksheet for other children. Worksheets promoting literacy for preschoolers include dotted letters for tracing, matching simple words to pictures or tracing solid words to make letters.

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    Build a Story

    Story building as a class is a fun activity that creates a display for the classroom. Use a large posterboard or large piece of paper, and begin the story with one sentence. Read the sentence to the preschoolers, then call on one child to provide one sentence built upon the existing sentence. Allow the children to get creative, and keep the story going until every child has had a chance to add a sentence. If the children are interested in the project, keep the story going! This project highlights listening, speaking, writing and reading skills, incorporating all four major literacy areas into one afternoon group activity. When the project is finished, display the story in the classroom to share with parents and visitors.

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    It is important for preschool language literacy activities to cover all aspects of literacy, including reading, writing, listening and speaking. While every project does not need to cover every aspect, a variety of projects can ensure all aspects are practiced. If preschool children are allowed to have a variety of literacy opportunities, such as the tracing activity done alone or the story activity done as a group, the chances of experiencing literacy heighten and students are able to choose their method of contact with different types of literacy.