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Preschool Special Needs: Help for Parents

written by: melinda47657 • edited by: Amanda Grove • updated: 3/2/2012

Parents of special needs children have huge responsibilities before them. One responsibility is to make sure their children are getting a proper education. This article describes preschool parent resources for children with special needs. Read on and become proactive for your child.

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    One of the biggest worries among parents is, “Is my child receiving the best education possible?” The worry increases tremendously for parents of children with special needs. Parents who are new to having a special needs child may not know of all the resources available to them. Preschool parent resources for children with special needs are out there, learn them, and become involved in your child's education early.

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    Does My Child Have a Disability?

    There are different types of disabilities of both a mental and physical nature. Parents might notice behavioral "warning signs" that may suggest a disability might exist. Parents, who believe their child may have a disability, should seek assistance immediately.

    If you think your child may have a disability speak with their pediatrician. Before seeing the doctor, make a list of reasons why your child may have a disability. This is an important step to complete because the doctor needs to be aware of every sign and symptom present. The more information you give the doctor the better equipped they are to diagnose.

    If the pediatrician confirms that your child has a disability one of the next steps is to contact your local school district. Public schools are legally bound to offer services to children with disabilities under the 1990 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). To get in touch with the school district, call the administration offices. Someone there should be able to direct you on what steps to take next. The process starts by testing the impact of the disability. Following the testing, there are meetings with school representatives to discuss your child’s disability and what services are needed to aid your child.

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    Early Education for Special Needs Children

    Under the IDEA Act your special needs child does have a right to any necessary services that will aide the child in his or her education. Many parents think their child has to be school aged to begin receiving services, but school districts are required to offer services to children with special needs starting at birth. These services offered to the child could be anything from physical therapy to psychological services.

    The most important thing a parent of a special needs child can do to ensure that child gets the education he or she deserves is to know your child’s rights. Make sure that your child is given the tools needed to be successful. Before you go to any type of meeting on planning your child’s education, do your homework. Read and comprehend the IDEA Act, If you have any questions about the IDEA Act, or the education your child is receiving, contact your state education agency. Parents are a key component when it comes to a child having a proper education. Speak up for your child.

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    Early Intervention

    Some may wonder why special education services begin at birth. It is because early intervention is so important. The sooner a special needs child gets educational assistance, the more capable that child is of functioning in an educational setting. Most students who receive early intervention need less assistance and have a smoother educational experience than those without early intervention. Some children do not have a need for special education services as they get older because they have learned the skills to cope with their disability through early intervention. Early intervention is an imperative part of a successful education for a special needs child.

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    Parents should use all available resources when providing their special needs child with an education. It is essential parents are knowledgeable of their child’s rights. Early intervention is the key to getting students on the right track.