Pin Me

Hoot: Problems At Home and In School

written by: Teresita Doebley • edited by: Carly Stockwell • updated: 1/7/2014

This lesson covers Chapters 15-Epilogue of the book, Hoot. The lesson plan includes discussion questions aimed toward a Middle School class.

  • slide 1 of 6

    Chapters 15-16

    800px-Burrowing-owl-3 Part A. Define the words below. Be sure to include the part of speech in the space provided. Write a sentence for each word. If the word is a verb, you may write a sentence using any form: past, present, or future.

    contemplate (vb)

    franchise ( )

    culprit ( )

    Part B. Answer the following in complete sentences.

    1. What do you notice about Curly’s language? Why would the author create a character like this?

    2. After Roy explained to his parents why he was fighting in school, Roy’s mother replied: “But even so, fighting is never the right thing.” What would have been the right thing for Roy to do?

    3. In his letter to Dana Matherson near or on pg. 32, Roy uses the word “arrangement.” Look up the definition and explain why Mrs. Eberhardt thinks Roy has chosen the wrong word for his letter.

    4. Word Origin/Word Search. This particular word on pg. 41 means “ring,” and its origin is Yiddish. Write the word below.

    5. Why does Curly find the pulled-up survey stakes such a problem?

    6. The author, Carl Hiaasen, builds suspense with the barbecued pork sandwich. How does he do this? Why does he do this?

    7. Summarize Ch. 15 & 16 in a few sentences.

  • slide 2 of 6

    Chapters 17-18

    Part A. Define the words below. Be sure to include the part of speech in the space provided. Write a sentence for each word. If the word is a verb, you may write a sentence using any form: past, present, or future.

    gloat (vb)

    bungle (vb)

    interject (vb)

    culprit ( )

    inquisitive ( )

    gala ( )

    pilfer (vb)

    delinquent ( )

    Part B. Answer the following in complete sentences.

    1. Word Origin/Word Search. Near or on pg. 216 there is a German word that means, “wooden block.” Write it below.

    2. When Garrett is explaining to Roy how the policeman caught Dana with rattraps “. . . stuck on his shoes. That’s how come he couldn’t run away.” Roy answers sarcastically, “I’m so sure.” Why was he being sarcastic?

    3. When Roy went to the building and zoning department, the clerk told him that the Mother Paula permit file was missing. Why is this a coincidence?

    4. Up until now, Officer Delinko’s unlikable character is one who is only concerned about his getting a promotion. In Ch. 18, what scene finally makes him likable?

    5. What topic did Roy use for his current events?

    6. Summarize Ch. 17 & 18 below.

  • slide 3 of 6

    Chapters 19-20

    Part A. Define the words below. Be sure to include the part of speech in the space provided. Write a sentence for each word. If the word is a verb, you may write a sentence using any form: past, present, or future.

    exasperate (vb)

    beckon (vb)

    dignitary ( )

    illuminate ( )

    impertinent ( )

    commence (vb)

    Part B. Answer the following questions in complete sentences.

    1. Word Origin/Word Search. Near or on pg. 275 this French word means, “tuft of hair.” Write it below.

    2. In Ch. 19, you see a softer side to Officer Delinko’s character. What is it?

    3. Why does Officer Delinko find it necessary to drink three thermoses of coffee?

    4. At the groundbreaking, how does Mother Paula (Miss Dixon) learn about the owls?

    5. How does Mullet appear at the groundbreaking?

    6. Why does Mullet have a string attached to his finger?

    7. How do the students show their solidarity?

    8. Summarize Ch. 19 & 20 in a few sentences.

  • slide 4 of 6

    Chapter 21 and Epilogue

    Part A. Define the words below. Be sure to include the part of speech in the space provided. Write a sentence for each word. If the word is a verb, you may write a sentence using any form: past, present, or future.

    impromptu ( )

    elation ( )

    epilogue ( )

    Part B. Answer the following questions in complete sentences.

    1. Who is Napoleon?

    2. Who is Kelly Colfax?

    3. Why does Mr. Eberhardt have the Mother Paula file from city hall?

    4. What document is missing from the city hall file?

    5. In the Epilogue, what happens to the following characters:

    Kimberly Lou Dixon:

    Chuck E. Muckle:

    Councilman Grandy:

    Miss Hennepin:

    Dana Matherson:

    Mullet Fingers:

    6. What does Roy finally accept at the end of the story?

    7. Summarize Ch. 21 & the Epilogue in a few sentences.

  • slide 5 of 6

    Cross Curricular Activities to Go Along with the Novel

    800px-Burrowing Owl 4212 While the following cross-curricular activities can be completed post-reading, they can be done concurrently with team faculty members while reading the text in Language Arts Literacy class. Depending on your allotment of time, activities can be assigned to cooperative learning groups.

    Learning Objectives

    The following cross-curricular activities will provide students with useful and appealing lessons to enhance the reading experience and foster a love for learning.

    1. Science

    • Science Net Links – Burrowing Owl Unit Plan (http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/burrowing-owls/)
    • Owl Pellet Dissection


    2. Technology

    • Burrowing Owl Live Web Cam (http://www.birdingadventures.com/livecam/?project=burrowing- owl)
    • Virtual Owl Pellet Dissection(http://www.kidwings.com/index.htm)
    • Owl WebQuest (https://sites.google.com/site/arthuracademytechnologyclass/home/owl-webquest)


    3. Art

    • Create an owl’s face using seeds and beans
    • Create awareness Posters on endangered species
    • Found Objects Owl Sculpture Art
    • Owl Soap Carving using clay tools, toothpicks, and cuticle sticks


    4. Math

    • Make a graph showing endangered bird species per state or per U.S.A. (http://www.endangeredspecie.com/)
    • Compare numbers of endangered species with another state and show the difference in percentages.
    • Graph coordinate pairs to create an owl image (http://www.superteacherworksheets.com/mystery-graph- picture/graph-owl.pdf)


    800px-Female Burrowing Owl feeding owlet (Athene cunicularia) 5. Language Arts Literacy

    • Persuasive speeches or essays on endangered animals
    • Personification: Write how you would feel if you were an endangered animal or flower.
    • Letter Writing: Do research on endangered species in your community, and write a letter to the newspaper expressing how you feel. Offer a solution to correct the problem.
    • Write a Haiku or Cinquain about an endangered animal.


    6. Student Council

    • Adopt a species through a local or state organization

References

  • By Kevin Cole from Pacific Coast, USA [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
  • By Dori (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
  • By William H. Majoros (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

"Hoot" by Carl Hiaasen

The novel "Hoot" is relevant for students in upper 5th grade to lower 7th graders, the optimal level being 6th grade. Covering such themes as making friends and protecting endangered animals, there are plenty of relevant topics for teachers to choose from.
  1. Hoot by Carl Hiaasen: Protecting Wildlife
  2. Hoot: It’s Tough Being the New Kid
  3. Hoot: Problems At Home and In School