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Hoot by Carl Hiaasen: Protecting Wildlife

written by: Teresita Doebley • edited by: Carly Stockwell • updated: 1/7/2014

"Hoot" is a great novel for enrichment class as well as Language Arts Literacy because there are so many relevant themes to today: bullying, new kid on the block, friendship and endangered animals. Guide your students through the novel with these activities and discussion questions.

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    Hoot Book Cover Age Level

    Appropriate for high 5th graders, 6th-, and lower level 7th graders. This lesson plan will focus on vocabulary development to include word origins, critical thinking questions, chapter summarizing, and figurative language development.

    Objectives

    1. Determine or clarify the meaning and/or origins of vocabulary words..
    2. Answer questions requiring students to learn about characterization, setting, and text comprehension.
    3. Learn various literary devices.

    Pre-Reading Activity

    Several days ahead, use themes of endangered animals, bullying, new students, and friendship as daily journal writing. Before each chapter pair lesson, the teacher may want to give a mini-lesson on the literary devices covered in the reading.

    Materials

    The novel Hoot by Carl Hiaasen, a 25-page notebook. and a dictionary and/or access to an online dictionary.

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    Ch. 1-2 Vocabulary and Questions

    Part A. Define the words below. Be sure to include the part of speech in the space provided. Write a sentence for each word. If the word is a verb, you may write a sentence using any form: past, present, or future.

    ambush (vb)

    vault (vb)

    site ( )

    vandalism ( )

    mischief ( )

    skeptical ( )

    pursue (vb)

    muted (vb)

    (un) provoked (vb)

    inedible ( )

    intimidate (vb )

    Part B. Answer the following in complete sentences.

    1. What is the protagonist’s (main character) name, and where is he originally from?

    2. Where does the setting of the story take place?

    3. After having read Ch. 1 & 2, how would you characterize Roy?

    4. So far in the story, what is the protagonist’s conflict?

    5. What two mysteries have you encountered?

    6. Authors use literary devices to enhance one’s reading of a book. On pgs. 14 – 15 find at least one simile and write it below.

    7. Word Origin/Word Search. On page 1 there is an Indian word that means “dust" or “dust-colored." It is also a type of fabric. Write the word below. (Don’t forget to use a complete sentence!)

    8. In a few short sentences, summarize Ch. 1 & 2.

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    Ch. 3-4 Vocabulary and Questions

    Part A. Define the words below. Be sure to include the part of speech in the space provided. Write a sentence for each word. If the word is a verb, you may write a sentence using any form: past, present, or future.

    contemplate (vb)

    franchise ( )

    culprit ( )

    Part B. Answer the following in complete sentences.

    1. What do you notice about Curly’s language? Why would the author create a character like this?

    2. After Roy explained to his parents why he was fighting in school, Roy’s mother replied: “But even so, fighting is never the right thing." What would have been the right thing for Roy to do?

    3. In his letter to Dana Matherson Roy uses the word “arrangement." Look up the definition and explain why Mrs. Eberhardt thinks Roy has chosen the wrong word for his letter.

    4. Word Origin/Word Search. This particular word on or around pg. 41 means “ring," and its origin is Yiddish. Write the word below.

    5. Why does Curly find the pulled-up survey stakes such a problem?

    6. The author, Carl Hiaasen, builds suspense with the barbecued pork sandwich. How does he do this? Why does he do this?

    7. Summarize Ch. 3 & 4 in a few sentences.

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    Ch. 5-6 Vocabulary and Questions

    Part A. Define the words below. Be sure to include the part of speech in the space provided. Write a sentence for each word. If the word is a verb, you may write a sentence using any form: past, present, or future.

    ominous ( )

    truancy ( )

    inevitable ( )

    altercation ( )

    kiosk ( )

    Part B. Answer the following in complete sentences.

    1. Who does Roy meet in Ch. 5?

    2. What dilemma does Roy face in Ch. 5?

    3. What dilemma did he face in Colorado?

    4. Word Origin/Word Search – we borrow this word from the French, but ultimately it comes from the Latin verb meaning “to wash." Write the word from pg. 66 below.

    5. What three signs of vandalism have there been on the Mother Paula’s Pancake House site?

    6. The newspaper had reported that Officer Delinko fell asleep during the surveillance because he was taking flu medication. Why didn’t Chief Deacon release the truth to the paper?

    7. What happened to Roy’s bicycle?

    8. Summarize Ch. 5 & 6 below.

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    Downloads

    Download the vocabulary and questions for use in the classroom.

"Hoot" by Carl Hiaasen

The novel "Hoot" is relevant for students in upper 5th grade to lower 7th graders, the optimal level being 6th grade. Covering such themes as making friends and protecting endangered animals, there are plenty of relevant topics for teachers to choose from.
  1. Hoot by Carl Hiaasen: Protecting Wildlife
  2. Hoot: It’s Tough Being the New Kid
  3. Hoot: Problems At Home and In School