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The Bees of Classroom Management: K-3rd Grade Classroom Rules

written by: ARobin • edited by: Wendy Finn • updated: 1/5/2012

To help the students in your class to learn and understand the importance of classroom rules, make your classroom rules attractive and memorable. For children in lower elementary grades, using "bees" to teach them how to "be" in the classroom is a cute and effective way to teach the classroom rules.

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    Know the Rules, Bee the Rules

    When teaching a classroom full of younger children the importance of the class rules, a classroom teacher may sometimes feel like her students do not understand the importance of following rules. By presenting the rules in a form that is captivating to a younger child, the success rate of a well structured classroom and attractive classroom will pay off. During the first two or three weeks of school, teachers should play a memory game with the children. Keep reviewing the rules over and over with the class, do not expect them to have a list memorized after the first few days of school. When the rules are presented in a creative ways such as "How To BEE In Class", children will have an easier time learning and comprehending the importance of the rules.

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    Directions for Bees

    Laminate bumble bee cut outs and write one rule on each:

    * Bee kind to friends

    * Bee a good listener

    * Bee respectful

    * Bee quiet while working

    * Bee helpful to your neighbor

    Display the rules on the wall or bulletin board around the bee hive.

    Review the classroom rules with children on a daily basis until routine is established.

    Idea: For children who follow the rules, give them a "bee" award.

    Idea: For children who are good classroom leader, make them "King" or "Queen" Bee for the day or week.

    Of course you could also get your students involved from the start and get them to make their own bees for the display.

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    Practice Makes Perfect

    Read aloud a book that addresses each rule. For example, Chrysanthemum, by Kevin Henkes (1991), would address "Bee Kind to Friends". Take time to model to the students what being kind to friends, a good listener, respectful, quiet while working, and helpful to your neighbor looks like in your classroom. Then call students forward to practice. When an inappropriate behavior happens in the classroom, draw on your examples as a reminder.