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Learning Spanish Online: Bueno, Entonces... the Facebook Version

written by: Bright Hub Education Writer • edited by: Rebecca Scudder • updated: 1/24/2013

Everything you ever wanted to know--and perhaps some things you didn't--about colloquial Spanish. They say everything is on Facebook, and you can even enhance the process of learning Spanish on this Facebook page.

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    Well, Then...

    I don't remember how Bueno, Entonces... (which can be translated as "Well, then...") first caught my eye, but once I took a look at their Facebook page I was hooked. It's my understanding that they offer a full language-learning system--not covered in this Bueno, Entonces... review--but the bite-size Facebook version, with short video lessons or illustrated tutorials on topics that range from hilarious to vocabulary are so realistic it's borderline inappropriate. This makes a great supplement to any Spanish language learning program.

    The greatest appeal of the Bueno, Entonces... Facebook page is that it's short, quick, and eminently useful. Even if you're not planning on using the sometimes risqué, occasionally offensive vocabulary you learn here, you'll probably want to be able to understand it if you ever hear it.

    By the way, you don't need a Facebook account to view the Bueno, Entonces... Facebook page; just click the link above.

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    Farts and pick-up lines are hardly the stuff of most formal Spanish classes, but no matter how proper you are, bodily functions and informal social interactions are bound to come up at some point. Why not learn how to handle them--or at least how to understand what others are saying about them? Learning this sort of vocabulary and grammar is also a great way to avoid making social gaffes; if you know how to say the word fart in Spanish, you're much less likely to use it, in all innocence, by mistake.

    (Hint: The Spanish verb pedir is irregular. But if you conjugate it as if it were a regular verb, you're talking about farts.)

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    Subject Matter

    The folks at Bueno, Entonces... themselves note that the subject matter on their Facebook page isn't always for the easily offended, and any Bueno, Entonces... review would be remiss in not pointing out the same thing. But this program's subject matter isn't all about body parts and bodily functions, and it relies on humor at least as heavily as the shock factor to catch your attention. The bulk of the material they publish on their Facebook page is encapsulated in short, to-the-point lessons focusing on a core concept or learning challenge.It's the combination of humor, irreverence and useful lessons that hold your attention, all delivered in quick, bite-size format through Facebook.

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    Useful or Not?

    These quick lessons won't turn you into a fluent speaker if you're starting from scratch--in fact they might be a little bit confusing if you don't have at least a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar. But if you've already started your language learning journey, just think of the Bueno, Entonces page updates as supplemental lessons. They're both entertaining and useful because they teach you how to handle real-world situations and topics. Although Bueno, Entonces... focuses primarily on South American Spanish in their Facebook lessons, they occasionally provide context from other Spanish-speaking regions as well.

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    A New Fan

    The Bueno, Entonces... Facebook page is an obvious leader for their full-fledged language program. They bill themselves as the replacement for Rosetta Stone, and while I can't speak to the validity of the Bueno, Entonces immersion system vs. Rosetta Stone, I can tell you that the Facebook updates work in exactly their intended purpose. It's hard not to be interested--sometimes fascinated, in all meanings of the word--by the material they select, and the short lessons are the perfect length to absorb quickly and still walk away with something useful. Just be warned that, before long, you'll want to buy their full program just to see how many giggles (and fart jokes) they can pack into a half-hour lesson.