German Language Study Guides & Tips (page: 2 of 4)

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  • German Words Used in English
    Studying German, you may have noticed the occasional word that looks eerily familiar as if we English speakers had adopted it for our own. In fact, you're right! There are many, many words that English has borrowed from German across the centuries. This article outlines a few.
  • Die Stadt: German Vocabulary for Getting Around Town
    Learn vocabulary to help you get around in a German-speaking area. Ask for and understand directions to specific places around town.
  • Learn German Online for Free With the German Pictorial Vocabulary Guide!
    You can learn hundreds of German vocabulary words, including the words' proper spelling and perfect pronunciation, using the free online resource "German Pictorial Vocabulary Guide," produced and hosted by LanguageGuide.org. This is an excellent resource for beginning students of German!
  • Learning German: Words and Phrases for Family Members and Other People
    The following article provides the German student with vocabulary and useful phrases for talking about family members and other people. Also included is a printable study sheet of the German vocabulary and phrases in this article.
  • Overview of the Perfekt Tense in German
    Help students learn how the "perfekt" tense in German (similar to the present perfect in English) is formed.
  • German Pronouns: Part 3: Dative Case
    German pronouns have both grammatical gender and grammatical case. The following four part series explores the nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive cases. Here we'll go over German pronouns in the dative case, which function as the indirect objects of sentences.
  • Denken oder Glauben? Learn to Use the Correct German Verb to Express " I Think"
    Learn where to use "denken" and its 'partners' and where "glauben" or another verb is more appropriate to say, " I think ..." in German.
  • German Pronouns, Part 4: Genitive Case
    German pronouns have both grammatical gender and grammatical case. This four-part series explores German pronouns in the nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive cases. Part four identifies the German pronouns in the genitive case, which function to indicate possession.
  • German Pronouns: Part 1: Nominative Case
    Abstract: German pronouns have both grammatical gender and grammatical case. The following four part series explores German pronouns in the nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive cases. Part one identifies the German pronouns in the nominative case, which function as the subjects of sentences.
  • Common German Idioms for Everyday Conversations
    Learning a foreign language is one thing, having an actual conversation in it... is quite another. Here's a quick guide to common German conversational idiomatic structures and usages that often confuse people trying to learn the language.
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